Tag Archives: personalised learning

Personalisation of Spelling

Developing a personalised learning program for Spelling requires preparation and resourcing as any personalised learning program does.  Selecting types of assessment and locating and collating resources that are meaningful and useful will help to create a solid foundation for students to work from.  The following paragraphs present a model that is used in classrooms that can be adapted and modified for use in your own context.

 

Assessment for Learning

Students need to know where their level of achievement is against expected standards, and what they have to be able to do to progress onto the next level.  Assessments should be aligned with the outcomes for your educational context so students are easily able to identify the path for progression.  Sometimes the teacher language in curriculum documents may need to be simplified to make it more accessible to students.

After completing assessment tasks, students need ready access to their data, as they become self trackers and self managers. 

In the school that I work in I have used On Demand Testing (ODT), Gap Testing and Online Assessment and Reporting System Progressive Achievement Tests (OARS PAT) with students.  Both ODT and OARS are online systems, while Gap is paper based.

 

Self Tracking

Students analyse the results of their assessment and identify areas of strength and weakness from their results.  Often the students can identify patterns in their results, which help them to determine which areas they need to work on more.  Students compare their results against the expected levels of achievement.  Initially students may want to keep their results private, but as they begin working closely with other students with similar needs, they become more confident and competitive within their ability cohort.

 

Goal Setting

Students take responsibility for their learning through the management and tracking of their data and by setting goals for their learning.  They follow the SAT framework, (Specific, Attainable, Timely) which is modified and simplified from the SMART goal setting framework.  These goals are set weekly at the beginning of the week, and can last for a single week or may be recycled or rolled over into the following week if the student reflects that they need to continue working.

 

Resources and Activities

An important part of the teacher’s responsibility is to provide appropriate resources for the students that provide a level of challenge and are matched to the students needs.  The resources selected should be suitable for the context and match their learning styles of the students.  For the most part these activities are completed independently with minimal supervision.  These activities are done at the beginning of a writing session so generally they need to be short activities to allow quick completion.  The teacher will have small groups created that have similar goals or spelling patterns/rules that are being worked on.  The relevant information should be recorded by the teacher during goal setting time to allow them time to analyse the goals and create groups.  Examining the abilities of students within the groups also provides the teacher an indication of the types of activities needed for the groups to work on.  Each day the teacher should work with a small group for a period of time to monitor and assess their progress on the tasks, work with them on explicit teaching activities.

 

Reflection

At the conclusion of the week students should complete a short assessment task, either a buddy test of their spelling words with a partner, or a test of words that are similar to their own words.  After the assessment task is completed students should record their progress and reflect on their learning for spelling for the week.  The format for the reflection should be flexible but recorded in some way.

They should include in their reflection a description of what they did for the week, how they felt about their work and the learning that occurred or did not occur, how the learning will help them or could have helped them, what else they could have done (if anything), and a further plan of action.

2011 – Only a few weeks in

student centered learningMaths workshops – So far this year we’ve been using Maths workshops for targeted, needs specific teaching in Maths Strands (Number, Space, MCD). We just over 100 Year 6 kids there is quite a spread of abilities, from working at VELS level 2, which equates to around two years below the expected level, to level 5.5, which is about 2 years ahead of the expected level. In one classroom with that big a spread, it’s difficult to give specific needs based teaching to each child. Workshops allow us to put like ability kids together.

Inquiry – Inquiry has also become a big push throughout our school as well. The role of the teacher has changed from the content deliverer to one of facilitator of learning opportunities for our students. Using inquiry in Science and Humanities alongside explicit teaching, students are able to follow topics that are of high interest to them. Hand in hand with high interest goes engagement.

As we progress through the year, there’ll be more things that we do differently to what we have done in the past, and I’ll post information about each of those things too.

Why personalised learning?

innovative educationOften when teachers hear the term ‘personalised learning’ and believe it to be a completely open ended system of teaching and learning, but personalised learning still holds explicit teaching at it’s core.  Explicit teaching that is tightly focussed and targeted to specific student needs.  In the majority of settings, personalised learning is already being used in various forms, Individual Learning Plans, ability grouping and differentiation.  But these methods are teacher centric, true personalised learning is a student centric pedagogy.  One where students decide on the path of their learning in collaboration with teachers by setting short term goals, and developing a path to succeed.

However, personalised learning doesn’t just happen oven night.  It is a massive pedagogical shift.  Teachers shift their role to that of a facilitator of learning, rather than a supplier of curriculum content.  Students shift their role from passive knowledge sponge to be a social constructor of knowledge.  Students need to take greater responsibility for their learning and to develop the competencies of flexibility and adaptability for their continued success in our rapidly changing and shrinking world.

This rapid social change and the sheer volume of new knowledge being created daily are two of the catalysts for the required shift in curriculum.  The content we expect the students to acquire by the time they graduate school is outdated by then, and is superseded by the rapidly evolving new knowledge.  The jobs they will work in, haven’t been invented yet.  The skills of regurgitating second hand knowledge and answering questions on an exam to prove their subject knowledge are becoming rapidly obsolete.  Those are Industrial Age skills.  Sure they are still relevant in the Post Industrial Age to an extent, but they are not the ways in which our students learn and work to the highest possible range of their abilities.